Cover illustration by Michael Hays, copyright 1990. Thanks to Walker Harper, professional graphic artist, for the scan. Here's the first paragraph:

"Mist enclosed Ahto in a pocket of visibility just big enough to see the ground and an occasional sudden stone. Again he called the high, musical summons that should have brought the flock to him. The birdlike calls of the other boys, and the panicked bleats of the flock, were faint and directionless. He wished the mist would burn away a little so he could see where he was -- no, he didn't. That would mean the sun was up and he had missed his ceremony."

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Cover illustration by Lane du Pont, copyright 1991. Used by permission. Thanks to Walker Harper, professional graphic artist, for the scan. It's a hard book to excerpt good passages from, so here's what Booklist said about it. Don't take Booklist's word for it, though. Read it!

"Griffin's notion of time travel as a means of understanding and appreciating family history is an ingenious one that will intrigue readers...Her novel is an action-packed one, full of quirky yet fascinating characters...that will appeal to time travel enthusiasts."

The flood and the riot in this story are real. So is the rest of it -- sort of.

Cover illustration by Pam-Ela Harrelson, copyright 1992. Used by permission. Thanks to Walker Harper, professional graphic artist, for the scan. Here's the first two paragraphs:

"Liza--Liza--Liza--that was her name now. She repeated it to herself several times every hour so as not to forget. Liza Franklin and her sister, Kay, who had the documents to prove it.

Beyond the gray-tinted bus windows, West Texas was as flat as the book of word-find puzzles in her lap; oil wells, cattle, sheep, and buzzards appearing so regularly they hardly counted as varying the endless miles of scrub and barbed wire. Hitchhiking through the Texas Hill Country had been neat; but since boarding the bus in Junction, running away had gotten boring."

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